Unsympathetic characterization?

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WHO IS GUILTY: THE CHILD OR ONE OF THE ADULTS?

Settling in at ‘home’ again? Is a crime imminent, or has one already happened?

In HOMED, the second in my Crime Shorts series, a boy is being ‘helped’ to settle in a civilised manner.

One of the issues I had in mind when I wrote this was the Australian disgust when they built standard homes for aborigines and then found that understanding and use of sanitation and housekeeping did not come automatically with the facilities provided.

We have to be inside the head of our characters when writing fiction. Even more so, perhaps, by ‘the helping professions.’

There are crimes motivated by negative emotions: jealousy, anger, need to control/overpower. There are also crimes perpetrated by ignorance. The crimes we may feel most are those that penetrate our individuality. Blind kindness, adherence to established process, bureaucracy – these can lead to damage also.

Read this story and decide where the crime lies.

Homed. (Crime Shorts Book 2)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/B00VAVQ1DS

REVIEWS: Oyster A boy with potential

Recent reviews

oyster_tiniest

A Brilliant Short Story
By Sheila M. Belshaw (South Africa)

An incredibly insightful look at the machinations of a boy so intellectually damaged that he cannot fit into normal society. Only a writer with a deep knowledge of the human psyche could carry off something as profoundly moving as this story is. The voice is amazingly real and I found myself following his twisted thoughts and seeing exactly where he was coming from, and at the same time feeling dreadfully sorry for him.
On top of all that, the story is beautifully written, so that nowhere does it not flow as though from the pen of a superb writer.

 

And from Austria, By C.R.Putsche

Oyster. A boy with potential By Rosalind Minett

This is an outstanding short story that I managed to devour in just one sitting. Rarely does an author so courageously expose truths, realities and day-to-day struggles of a boy who finds it difficult to fit in to society.

Jake tells us his disturbing story from a first person narrative which gives the reader a real insight in to his tangled thoughts and feelings that you can somehow sympathise with him and understand his unbalanced mind, while nervously anticipating what he will do next. Jake has quite the back story, as he comes from a dysfunctional family who put his safety, health and wellbeing at risk which results in him being moved from one adoptive family to another before he ends up in the Home and yet another Home before he commits his greatest atrocity in his short life so far.

Make no mistake this book is a real frightener, albeit a book of fiction and a major credit to Rosalind Minett who knows her stuff when it comes to the workings of an unbalanced mind besides having a literal talent to depicts things of an unnatural nature.

These are two of the 5* reviews on Amazon.

The review is also on this review site, as shown below this post.

http://walkerputsche.wordpress.com

Catherine Rose Putsche Book Blog

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00OQTA1FK/ref=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_0

Oyster
A boy with potential
By Rosalind Minett
This is an outstanding short story that I managed to devour in just one sitting. Rarely does an author so courageously expose truths, realities and day-to-day struggles of a boy who finds it difficult to fit in to society.
Jake tells us his disturbing story from a first person narrative which gives the reader a real insight in to his tangled thoughts and feelings that you can somehow sympathise with him and understand his unbalanced mind, while nervously anticipating what he will do next. Jake has quite the back story, as he comes from a dysfunctional family who put his safety, health and wellbeing at risk which results in him being moved from one adoptive family to another before he ends up in the Home and yet another Home before he commits his greatest atrocity in his short life so far.

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The story parents neglect

Now available on Kindle and in paperback, Intrusion, Book 1 of this coming-of-age WWII trilogy.

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A Relative Invasion is set in 1937 to 1965. It has WW2 as a backdrop but it isn’t essentially a war story. It has a child narrator, but it isn’t written for children. I’ve attempted to reproduce in micro those very emotions which the frustrated, humiliated German nation experienced post WWI and which Hitler played upon. I’ve put them in the breast of Kenneth, an artistic, manipulative child, small for age and frail, when meeting his younger, stronger cousin. It’s this sturdy youngster, Billy, who is the innocent protagonist, suffering psychological bullying from his cousin, and physical bullying by his uncle. Intrusion starts the story as war in Europe threatens. Readers see how, in parallel, Billy’s predictable life will be threatened by Kenneth and a domestic war may begin.

The inferiority that six-year-olds can suffer is really the same as those of de-powered nations. What lay in the breast of Hitler, a poor specimen of a man without the kind of background he craved, was that desire to outdo and take over other leaders, other movements, other nations just as sickly Kenneth, whose muscly father Billy resembles, aims to over-reach Billy and encroach upon every aspect of his life. In this way he seeks to absorb another’s strength.

The adults with their own preoccupations fail to intervene.

Billy sustains his spirits by thinking of what he has secretly been shown; the shashka, a Cossack sabre with a special significance.

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Billy has seen this in the home of his father’s colleague, Mr Durban. Caught up in his own fearful memories, Mr Durban’s WWI story of how he came to own the shashka captures Billy’s imagination. The shashka acts as an icon that supports Billy throughout hardships, separations, rejections and evacuations.

In Books 2 and 3 of the trilogy, Billy has known anxiety, distress, hardship and seen the trauma of others. He has learned of the dangers of distant warfare and the satisfaction of supporting the vulnerable. With increasing age and experience, he discovers the dangerous qualities of the shashka and, ultimately, those hidden within himself. For that reason, Books 2 and 3 are loss-of-innocence as well as a coming-of-age story, and therefore rather darker.

Billy is five at the beginning of Book 1 and in his twenties by the end of Book 3. His emotional and moral development occurs alongside the acting out and ending of World War II and similarly ends as the devastation caused by warfare at macromicroall levels must be faced and overcome.To the child himself, there is nothing twee about childhood – a fact that adults often fail to realise.

My intention in the writing of Billy’s story in this particular stage of history is to show that we understand at the macro level is happening in micro. Kenneth is a Germany to Billy’s Britishness, but Billy is blind to his inherent and acquired advantages as perceived by Kenneth.

To the child himself, there is nothing twee about childhood – a fact that adults often fail to realise.